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Perthshire is a very photogenic county, ideal for a photographer looking for Highland and lowland landscapes.

Discovering Perthshire

The Perthshire Mountains and glens are home to an astonishing range of scenic and wildlife attractions, making it an ideal space to explore with a camera. Camera enthusiasts of all abilities and ages are drawn to Pitlochry and Perthshire as the scenery offers a broad range of subjects and techniques to try out.

Perthshire is a very photogenic county, ideal for a photographer looking for Highland and lowland landscapes, waterfalls, woodlands and wildlife.

Many tourists visit Perthshire to walk or drive into the countryside and take advantage of the scenery; whether you are interested in nature, trees, animals, history or architecture, Perthshire has something special that you can’t find anywhere else.

For the guests who want to travel further than Perthshire, Edinburgh and Glasgow are easily accessible through the area’s great transport links. Nearby, the Speyside whisky trail, Royal Deeside and Aberdeen are all possible day trips; and if you are staying at the Birchwood Hotel, then a warm welcome and a delicious local dinner will be awaiting you on your return in our exquisite on-site restaurant.

Loch Tummel and Loch Rannoch

Within a half-hour drive from Pitlochry you can visit Loch Tummel and Loch Rannoch. Loch Tummel is a beautiful long narrow loch just six miles west of Pitlochry. An excellent place for photography, the area around the River Tummel and Loch Tummel is one of the most picturesque points in the area, with its ever-changing colours throughout the seasons and its many places to walk, cycle or take a break. Loch Tummel is home to the stunning Queens View – which is one of the most famous viewpoints in Scotland. There is a Queens View visitor centre where guests can visit the tearoom, forest shop and watch an excellent audio-visual film.

A little further (20 miles from Pitlochry), Loch Rannoch offers water sport, glorious vistas and wildlife heritage. The loch lies on the traditional main route north to the west of Scotland, known as the ‘Road to the Isles’. There are sandy beaches on the north coast available for picnics and spectacular views perfect for photographs.

Both Loch Tummel and Loch Rannoch are overlooked by the fairy mountain, Schiehallion, a readily accessible Munro (the name given to Scottish mountains over 3000 feet tall).

Rannoch Moor – beautiful scenery for photography

A little further along the ‘Road to the Isles’ is the haunting, big-sky emptiness of Rannoch Moor, a boggy moorland where you can walk overlooking the breathtakingly dramatic mountains of Glencoe or take a refreshment in the oasis of the station tea room. The area has been used in a number of films and literature, including the film Trainspotting and the novel Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Big Tree Country – for breath-taking nature imagery

Perthshire has become known as Big Tree Country due to its huge range of gigantic and very old trees. On your visit to Pitlochry you can admire the tallest tree in Britain or ponder the 3000-year-old Fortingall Yew, thought to be the oldest living thing in Europe.

With over 200,000 acres of woodlands, full to the brim of remarkable trees and plant-life, and magnificent ancient trees for you to capture, and the rich habitat is home to an astonishing array of wildlife. Visitors are frequently greeted by a roe deer or a red squirrel and there is a large variety of birds, animals and insects to be found. Further down on on the woodland floor you’ll find various fungi and wood ants.

We encourage guests to take in the lush greenery of summer, the stunning reds, golds and browns of autumn, the hazy freshness of spring or the remnants of the ancient Caledonian forest.

Historic Perthshire Landscape

The landscape of Perthshire was created by the last Ice Age which ended 10,000 years ago leaving flat-bottomed, steep sided, U-shaped glens (valleys). The glens of the major rivers like the Tay, Tummel and Garry were left deeper than their tributaries resulting in these side streams creating a multitude of scenic waterfalls. The Black Spout waterfall is part of a delightful walk from the Birchwood and Bruar falls and the Birks O' Aberfeldy are short drives away.

All over Perthshire you will discover little-used roads, unspoiled by coaches and commercial traffic, on which you can take your own time to absorb the tranquil majesty of the highlands.

It’s easy to see why so many photographers are attracted to Perthshire; indeed, the area has its own photography society and is full of both beginner and experienced photographers.

During your stay at the Birchwood Hotel, why not ask the owner John about discovering Perthshire with a camera? A keen photographer himself, he is the ideal person to ask for advice regarding the best (and secret) sites to take great photographs, and will happily suggest ideas for excursions and day trips while you are here.

What kind of camera do I need to take photos in Perthshire?

It is completely up to you what type of camera you bring for your holiday in Perthshire, and your choice will depend on your budget, your desired photographs and your level of experience. Some of our guests bring cameras with interchangeable lenses, some use digital cameras and others use their smartphone. As long as you are confident you can use your camera, you will be able to get some fantastic shots.

If, however, you want to go beyond taking straightforward images, and would like to have a manual input in your photography, then a camera with changeable lenses, focus and shutter speed will enable you to experiment with different techniques.

For further information on photography in Scotland, you can visit the Scottish Photographic Federation, the Photographic Alliance of Great Britain, and the Royal Photographic Society. For information on landscape photography, visit the Landscape Photography Magazine

 

Perthshire is a very photogenic county, ideal for a photographer looking for Highland and lowland landscapes, waterfalls, woodlands and widllfe. John is a keen photographer and is happy to suggest excursions and locations for guests interested in photograhy.

The landscape of Perthshire was created by the last Ice Age which ended 10,000 years ago leaving flat-bottomed, steep sided, U-shaped glens (valleys). The glens of the major rivers like the Tay, Tummel and Garry were left deeper than their tributaries resulting in these side streams creating a multitude of scenic waterfalls. The Black Spout waterfall is part of a delightful walk from the Birchwood and Bruar falls and the Birks O' Aberfeldy are short drives away.